Can You Get a DWI on a Horse in Missouri?

In recent years, two Amish men made global headlines after being caught in Ohio for drinking and driving a horse and buggy.


When police attempted to talk with them, the males allegedly escaped into the woods, leaving the animal and carriage behind.


If the identical event had occurred in Missouri, the guys might not have had anything to worry about.

Missouri’s DWI statutes do not apply to horse-drawn buggies.


DWI in Missouri requires a self-propelled motorized vehicle. You can’t be punished for DWI for anything like a horse and buggy or even riding a horse.


Driving while drunk is a crime in Missouri if a person operates a vehicle while in an inebriated state.


Although a horse and buggy is not a vehicle, a lawn mower is.


A horse and buggy, like a bicycle, does not fulfill the state’s definition of a vehicle.


Some defense attorneys argued that horse and buggy drivers would be exempt from Missouri’s rules against negligent and imprudent driving since the carriages are not considered vehicles.


Even though Missouri’s DWI rules do not seem to encompass horses and buggies, it’s still not a smart idea to get behind the wheel after too many drinks.


If a kid is in the buggy, causing an accident may result in property damage penalties and an endangerment penalty.

10 Unexpected Ways You CAN Get a DWI

Going Biking

Because of DWI statutes, drinking while biking will get you a DWI in many circumstances.


Under the law, a vehicle is characterized as any instrument capable of operating on a public roadway or by which any individual or property could be transported. 


That implies you can get a DWI charge on a bike if you can ride it!

Riding In Golf Carts

You might face a DWI charge if you’ve been drinking and your cart driving is erratic, violent, or hazardous. 


These tickets are rare since golf courses are typically private. However, if you are a club member, they may terminate your membership if the police are involved.

Aboard a Vessel

Boating under the influence of alcohol is illegal under every state’s laws. 


Port officials have the same influence on the water as police officers on land, meaning you might be stopped and penalized if they discover you drinking while boating. So, on your next fishing expedition, bring an established, sober driver.

Driving a Lawn Mower

Do you own an expensive riding lawnmower?


Do you want to mow your lawn while drinking a beer?


Lawnmowers, like tractors, are considered vehicles under the law. The same is true with standing lawnmowers. 


Some DWI lawnmower cases occur when inebriated persons try to operate a lawnmower on a major road, believing they would not be arrested. But they’re completely incorrect.

Segway Riding

While some DWI penalties are issued to inebriated Segway riders, most are ultimately converted to public intoxication citations. 


Segway laws are still in their early stages, and their legality is murky. Several jurisdictions, notably Virginia and California, have taken steps to classify Segways as motor vehicles.

Driving a Moped

Mopeds are growing increasingly popular, and so are DWIs connected to them. It’s undoubtedly related to the reality that mopeds are advertised on college grounds, where individuals have a propensity to binge drink. 


Moped sales have skyrocketed in recent decades, with the majority of sales occurring in big cities.


Mopeds have grown so prevalent in metropolitan areas that moped rental locations have sprung up. 


Madison, Wisconsin, authorities even enacted parking legislation to keep streets clear of mopeds. 


A Virginia guy led the cops on a moped pursuit in 2014 while lugging a pack of beer.

Using A Tractor

In November 2017, an Illinois citizen was charged with DWI after riding his tractor in a residential area. 


Although many farmers feel their tractors are agricultural equipment, it is nevertheless classified as a car in several jurisdictions. You may even acquire a DWI when driving on your property if it is unfenced or backs up against public roads.

When Driving an Electric Vehicle

Although it doesn’t utilize petrol, electric vehicles are not free from DWI laws. You may get fined while riding an electric scooter, wheelchair, or bike. 


These DWI laws usually have loopholes since driving electric cars while intoxicated normally results in a public drunkenness charge. 


An Ohio resident was arrested for DWI after veering his motorized wheelchair into the road and generating a four-mph traffic standstill. 


While California divided its bike rules, it also approved a law to handle electric skateboards, enabling authorities to charge drunk driving if you are discovered riding one under the influence.

Making Use of a Snowmobile

Anyone convicted of DWI in Minnesota must wait 1 year before operating a snowmobile. They are classed in the same motor category as ATVs in Wisconsin. If you reside in a state with a snowy, cold winter, snowmobiles are probably included in the DWI rules.

A Toy Car for a Child

You were mistaken if you assumed traveling around intoxicated in your kids’ toy Jeep would be amusing.


Thanks to multiple people testing this, we know that children’s toy vehicles may still earn you arrested, particularly if you have a beer in the back. 


Because these toys contain a battery, they use power steering and will be charged as motor vehicles.

Contact a Kansas City DUI Attorney

You should contact a Kansas City DWI attorney if you’ve already been charged with a DUI.


A good law firm is crucial when clients face DWI charges. A Kansas City DWI lawyer can represent you in court, contest sobriety test results, and determine if you need to install an ignition interlock device in your car. 


Those in Kansas and Missouri should contact the Law Office of Benjamin Arnold today for additional information on drunk driving laws and defenses in Missouri from a DWI lawyer in Kansas City, Missouri.

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